Reveal360 Inspection Services LLC
Reveal360 Inspection Services LLC INSPECTION

Inspection Report

OLDER HOME INSPECTION

Property Address:
Older Home
Fort Collins CO 00000

 

Reveal360 Inspection Services LLC

Todd Gourley
4742 Westbury Dr.
Fort Collins, Colorado. 80526
970-389-1250

Top Table of Contents Bottom

Table of Contents

Top Table of Contents Bottom
Date: 2/4/2023 Time: 08:00 AM Report ID: 20230204-older-home
Property:
Older Home
Fort Collins CO 00000
Customer:
OLDER HOME INSPECTION
Real Estate Professional:

READ THE ENTIRE REPORT FOR COMPLETE UNDERSTANDING OF THIS PROPERTY

Comment Key or Definitions

The following definitions of comment descriptions represent this inspection report. All comments by the inspector should be considered before purchasing this home. Any recommendations by the inspector to repair or replace suggests a second opinion or further inspection by a qualified contractor. All costs associated with further inspection fees and repair or replacement of item, component or unit should be considered before you purchase the property.

Inspected (IN) = I visually observed the item, component or unit and if no other comments were made then it appeared to be functioning as intended allowing for normal wear and tear.

This section may include:

  • Questions to ASK the current property owners
  • Suggestions on Ways to Protect Your Investment
  • Suggestions on How to Operate Your Home, some systems
  • Noted: items for repair that are deemed minor or cosmetic but may be more concerning to you


Not Inspected (NI)= I did not inspect this item, component or unit and made no representations of whether or not it was functioning as intended and will state a reason for not inspecting.

Not Present (NP) = This item, component or unit is not in this home or building.

Repair or Replace (RR) = The item, component or unit is not functioning as intended, or needs further inspection by a qualified contractor. Items, components or units that can be repaired to satisfactory condition may not need replacement.

Action Summary = The following items are suggestions for repairs or replacement or further evaluation that should be considered for correction prior to moving in to the home.

Improvements for Health & Safety Summary = The following items are suggestions for improvements to occupant health and safety and should be considered for implementation upon moving into the home. Typically, items are upgrades to modern standards from when the home was originally constructed.

QUALIFICATIONS:

ASHI (AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HOME INSPECTORS) 263277 Certified Home Inspector

ICC (INTERNATIONAL CODE COUNCIL) 8253912 Certified Building Inspector (Residential and Commercial)

NRPP (National Radon Proficiency Program) Certified Radon Measurement Professional 111064-RT

State of Colorado - DORA Licensed Radon Measurement Professional RME:048

Certified Residential Thermographer #20220819011

FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) Certified Drone Pilot 3994424

Former builder/remodeler and county building inspector 

Lead Paint and Asbestos Note:

Lead Paint Note: In 1978 the federal government banned the use of lead-based paint in residential buildings. According to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, more than one-half of the U.S. housing stock---and more than three-quarters of units built before 1978---contains some lead-based paint. If you have questions regarding possible lead based paint in this home, consult with your agent.

Asbestos Note: Asbestos is a known carcinogen, and when exposed, tiny particles can be released into the air you breathe. In most dwellings, which were built prior to 1981, asbestos was commonly used as a construction material. In various parts of your dwelling, asbestos materials may have been used in the original construction or in renovations prior to the enactment of federal laws which limit asbestos in certain construction materials. The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has determined that the mere presence of asbestos materials does not pose a health risk to occupants and that such materials are safe so long as they are not dislodged or disturbed in a manner that causes the asbestos fibers to be released. Disturbances include sanding, scraping, pounding, or other techniques that produce dust and cause the asbestos particles to become airborne. The EPA does not require that intact asbestos materials be removed. Instead, the law simply requires that we take reasonable precautions to minimize the chance of damage or disturbance of those materials.

 Considerations for an Older Home

The home inspected today was constructed at a time when building practices were different than those of today. The home inspector considers this while inspecting and reports on deficiencies that need to be brought to the attention of the user of this report.

Occupant safety standards have increased since the home was constructed and deficiencies will be reported.  Some deficiencies are in need of attention prior to move-in while other improvements should be implemented when applicable.

It is highly recommended the user read the entire report for valuable information.

In Attendance:
Customer and their agent

Type of building:
Single Family (2 story)

Approximate age of building:
1905 (118 years) with 2009 addition and 2019 remodel

Temperature:
30's

Weather:
Cloudy

Ground/Soil surface condition:
Snow Covered

Radon Test:
Yes

Sewer Scope:
Yes

 

Top Table of Contents Bottom

Action Summary


Reveal360 Inspection Services LLC

4742 Westbury Dr.
Fort Collins, Colorado. 80526
970-389-1250

Customer
OLDER HOME INSPECTION

Address
Older Home
Fort Collins CO 00000

The following items or discoveries indicate that these systems or components do not function as intended or adversely affects the habitability of the dwelling; or warrants further investigation by a specialist, or requires subsequent observation. This summary shall not contain recommendations for routine upkeep of a system or component to keep it in proper functioning condition or recommendations to upgrade or enhance the function or efficiency of the home. This Summary is not the entire report. The complete report may include additional information of concern to the customer. It is recommended that the customer read the complete report.

1. Roofing
1.0 Roof Coverings  
Repair or Replace
(2) Item(s) of concern:
  • inadequate splice of ridge cap - original home

The opening at the splice has allowed moisture to enter the attic space as evidenced by discoloration on top of the insulation.

I suggest a roofing contractor with experience in installing metal roofs rebuild the splice and install ridge venting per section 8.4.

1.0 Photo 2
possible inadequate slice of ridge cap - original home
1.0 Photo 3
water entry from ridge _ staining on insulation
1.0 Photo 4
opening at splice
(3) Item(s) of concern:
  • openings to attic space- original home - front right corner

Openings should be closed to prevent pest from entering the attic space.

I suggest a roofing contractor with experience in metal roofing completely close off unnecessary openings and check the entire roof for similar concerns.

1.0 Photo 5
openings to attic space- original home
1.2 Skylights, Chimneys and Roof Penetrations  
Repair or Replace
(2) Item(s) of concern:
  • sealant in place of proper flashing at cast iron vent
  • incorrect flashing style at plumbing vent

I suggest an experienced roofing contractor install the correct flashing around plumbing penetrations.

1.2 Photo 3
sealant in place of proper flashing at cast iron vent
1.2 Photo 4
incorrect flashing style at plumbing vent
1.2 Photo 5
example of correct flashing for metal roofs
1.2 Photo 6
done correctly at addition
1.3 Roof Drainage Systems  
Repair or Replace
(2) Item(s) of function concern:
  • gutter downspouts missing extensions and/or need redirection

I suggest adding extensions to the downspouts and routing them 3-6' away from the foundation to prevent foundation settlement. They can be purchased at most home improvement stores.

Note: settlement has occurred around the perimeter of the foundation, over time, due to this condition.

Noted: front left gutter not secure to brick. I suggest a handy person reattach to the brick.

1.3 Photo 4
extend downspouts
1.3 Photo 5
extend downspouts
1.3 Photo 6
front left gutter not secure to brick
1.3 Photo 7
front left gutter not secure to brick
X
1.3 Photo 8
video
2. Exterior
2.8 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage, Driveway, Walkways, Concrete Surfaces  
Repair or Replace
(1) Item(s) of health concern:
  • unsanitary conditions in back yard

The amount of pet feces in the back yard has reach an unhealthy level.

I suggest the sellers have all the dog feces removed.

2.8 Photo 1
unsanitary conditions
(2) Item(s) of concern:
  • cut back vegetation from the original homes foundation

I suggest cutting back the vegetation from the foundation to keep moisture away from the structure.

2.8 Photo 2
not all areas photographed
3. Structural Components
3.0 Foundation  
Repair or Replace
(2) Noted: abandoned gas piping, copper water lines, HVAC ducting litter the crawlspace and withing the floor system as seen from the basement of the original home.

I suggest the crawlspace and floor system be cleared of all abandoned building materials as occupants may not know if the items are actively in use or not.

Note: removal of debris in the crawlspace is recommended prior to installing a vapor barrier or sub membrane radon system.

3.0 Photo 7
debris in crawlspace
3.0 Photo 8
abandoned building materials
3.0 Photo 9
abandoned building materials
3.0 Photo 10
abandoned gas piping
3.1 Walls (Structural)  
Repair or Replace
Item of concern:
  • front right corner of original home - brick mortar joint damage due to mismanagement of roof water

The brick has experienced settlement with displacement and continues to be damaged by mismanagement of roof water.

I suggest a brick mason repair the brick as needed and the downspout be extended well past the foundation/wall.

3.1 Photo 1
front right corner of original home
3.1 Photo 2
brick mortar joint damage due to mismanagement of roof water
4. Interiors
4.3 Steps, Stairways and Railings  
Repair or Replace
(1) Item(s) of safety concern:
  • missing guardrail at interior stairs to lower level

Common building practices required a guardrail is installed when there is a potential fall of greater than 30 inches.

I suggest an experienced carpenter install the guardrail for the safety of the occupants.

4.3 Photo 1
missing guardrail
(2) Item(s) of safety concern:
  • lower level handrail pulling out of wall

I suggest an experienced handy person repair for the safety of the occupants.

4.3 Photo 2
lower level handrail
4.3 Photo 3
pulling out of wall
4.4 Counters and Cabinets (representative number)  
Repair or Replace
Item(s) of safety concern:
  • bath vanity not secure to the wall - lower level bath

I suggest properly anchoring this vanity for the safety of the occupants and to prevent possible damage to the structure should plumbing elements become loose and leak.

An experienced handy person could address this item.

4.4 Photo 1
lower level bath
X
4.4 Photo 2
video - bath vanity not secure to the wall
4.6 Windows  
Repair or Replace, Improvements for Health and Safety
(1) Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • bedroom window well emergency egress ladder not secure

I suggest the ladder be anchored to the well for the safety of the occupants.

4.6 Photo 1
egress ladder not secure
5. Plumbing System
5.1 Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures  
Repair or Replace
(3) Item(s) of function concern:
  • lower toilet running
  • water shut off valve turned off to conserve water

I suggest repairs by a qualified plumber.
5.1 Photo 5
lower toilet running
5.1 Photo 6
water shut off valve turned off to conserve water
6. Heating / Central Air Conditioning
6.0 Heating Equipment  
Repair or Replace
(2) Item(s) of concern: furnace in attic
  • vent connector showing rust - possible end of service life
  • blower compartment showing rust and debris
  • air filter damaged with gaps - air filter has to be deformed in order to install
  • very dirty air filter

The furnace appears to not have been routinely serviced.

I suggest an HVAC pro service the furnace and determine the remaining lifespan.

Noted: attic furnace thermostat not functioning. Ask the sellers if the thermostat is operable or has been bypassed?

6.0 Photo 3
vent connector showing rust
6.0 Photo 4
blower compartment showing rust and debris
6.0 Photo 5
blower compartment showing rust
6.0 Photo 6
attic furnace - air filter damaged with gaps
6.0 Photo 7
air filter has to be deformed in order to install
6.0 Photo 8
very dirty air filter
6.0 Photo 9
attic furnace thermostat not functioning
6.0 Photo 10
has batteries and wiring
6.2 Automatic Safety Controls  
Repair or Replace
Item(s) of safety concern:
  • safety switch not functioning as intended - both furnaces
  • attic furnace switch has been bypassed
  • safety switch is taped over - basement furnace

I suggest an HVAC pro enable the safety switches for the safety of those opening the cabinet doors.

6.2 Photo 1
attic furnace switch has been bypassed
6.2 Photo 2
safety switch is taped over - basement furnace
6.3 Distribution Systems  
Repair or Replace
(1) Item(s) of interior air heath concern:
  • ducts attached to the furnace distribution system may need to be cleaned
  • evidence based on debris in many supply registers
  • level of debris at air filter and in blower compartment of attic furnace

I suggest contracting with a duct cleaning company to clean the HVAC ducting system to improve the air of the interior environment.

6.3 Photo 1
debris in many supply registers
6.8 Gas Distribution System  
Repair or Replace
Item of safety concern:
  • CSST (Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing) (yellow) was used for part of the gas delivery system.

This particular CSST (yellow) is susceptible to nearby lightning strikes and requires electrical bonding to the grounding electrode system.

I suggest this grounding procedure to be performed by a qualified, knowledgeable electrician according to the specific manufacturer’s instructions.

The manufacturer’s instructions for this bonding/grounding can be found as an attachment in the table of contents.

Additional information for builders, contractors and sub contractors:

A photo is attached to help illustrate: yellow jacket is not arc-resistant, black jacket is...

The related code is 2018 IRC G2411.2 CSST.

This section applies to corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) that is not listed with an arc-resistant jacket or coating system in accordance with ANSI LC1/CSA 6.26. CSST gas piping systems and piping systems containing one or more segments of CSST shall be electrically continuous and bonded to the electrical service grounding electrode system or, where provided, the lightning protection grounding electrode system.

6.8 Photo 1
yellow CSST
6.8 Photo 2
yellow CSST in attic
6.8 Photo 3
yellow CSST
6.8 Photo 4
where to ground
6.8 Photo 5
yellow jacket is not arc-resistant, black jacket is...
6.10 Gas/LP Firelogs and Fireplaces  
Repair or Replace
(1) The living room vented gas fireplace operates.

I suggest the fireplace be serviced based on current conditions found under the fireplace and the soot build-up on termination.

6.10 Photo 1
living room vented gas fireplace
6.10 Photo 2
accumulation of dog hair and debris
6.10 Photo 3
soot build-up
(2) Item(s) of safety concern:
  • gas shut off for fireplace not found - is it one as seen in photograph?

It is required by common building practices to label (near the fireplace) where the gas shut off is located when the shut off is elsewhere in the home.

I suggest the sellers or fireplace specialist (while there cleaning the unit) located and label the gas shut off valve.

6.10 Photo 4
gas shut off for fireplace?
6.11 Cooling Equipment  
Repair or Replace
(1) The Goodman AC unit is a 2009 model, it is 14 years old with an average life span of 10-15 years.  It is near the end of its average lifespan.

I recommend an HVAC professional evaluate the appliance for the remaining useable life and provide estimates for replacement, if needed.


Item(s) of concern:
  • wiring exposed to moisture at misaligned cabinet

I suggest repairs and evaluation by an HVAC pro.

6.11 Photo 1
Goodman AC unit 14 years old
6.11 Photo 2
wiring exposed to moisture
(2) The Goodman AC unit is a 2008 model, it is 15 years old with an average life span of 10-15 years.  It is near the end of its average lifespan.

I recommend an HVAC professional evaluate the appliance for the remaining useable life and provide estimates for replacement, if needed.

6.11 Photo 3
Goodman AC unit
6.11 Photo 4
15 years old
(3) Item(s) of concern:
  • AC system condensate discharge depositing at foundation - right side of home

Since water only comes out of this discharge when the AC is operating (hot temps = won't freeze), I suggest an experienced handy person extend this discharge down to the grading and away from the foundation.

6.11 Photo 5
AC system condensate discharge depositing at foundation
7. Electrical System
7.3 Connected Devices and Fixtures (Observed from a representative number operation of ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling's exterior walls)  
Repair or Replace
(1) Item(s) of function concern:
  • east wall - middle receptacle showing ungrounded (all others grounded so likely a loose wire)
  • j-box needs cover - basement of original home
  • equipment with no function?? - basement of original home - suggest labeling as "not in use" or remove

I suggest repairs by a qualified electrician.

7.3 Photo 1
east wall - middle receptacle showing ungrounded
7.3 Photo 2
j-box needs cover - basement of original home
7.3 Photo 3
equipment with no function??
7.4 Polarity and Grounding of Receptacles  
Repair or Replace
Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • laundry, main level bath - left of toilet, sewage ejection pump receptacles not GFCI protected

I suggest these receptacles be replaced with GFCI receptacles for the safety of the occupants. OR install a GFCI breaker at main breaker panel.

Consult a qualified electrician to address these items.

Additional information: A GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupter) receptacle is an electrical device that is designed to shut off power when it detects current flow through an unintended path such as a person or water.  They are used to reduce the risk of electrical shock and electrical fires. 

For more on where GFCI's are required:

Where GFCI's are required

7.4 Photo 1
laundry not GFCI protected
7.4 Photo 2
main level bath - left of toilet
7.4 Photo 3
sewage ejection pump
7.7 Smoke Detectors  
Repair or Replace
Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • smoke detectors not located - in hall ceiling outside primary bedroom

I suggest installing smoke detectors per the information below:

Smoke Detectors are required in the following locations:

1. In each sleeping room.

2. Outside each sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms.

3. On each additional story of the dwelling, including basements and habitable attics but not including crawl spaces and uninhabitable attics. 

Smoke detectors alert occupants to a fire/smoke in the home. I suggest they are installed in the required locations and tested periodically.

Smoke detectors can be hardwired with battery backup or battery operated only; each will meet the requirement.

An electrician or experienced handy person could address this item.

7.7 Photo 1
where required
7.8 Carbon Monoxide Alarms  
Repair or Replace
Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • No carbon monoxide alarm for upper level bedroom - install in hall just outside bedroom door

An electrician or experienced handy person could address this item.

How should carbon monoxide alarms be installed? According to this law, carbon monoxide alarms must be installed in one of the following ways:

- Wired directly into the home’s electrical system

-   Directly plugged into an electrical outlet (does not require a switch other than a circuit breaker)

-   Any battery powered alarm can be attached to the wall or ceiling of the home.     

Where should carbon monoxide alarms be installed? This law requires that an operational carbon monoxide alarm be installed within 15 feet of the entrance to each bedroom (or other room lawfully used for sleeping purposes), or in any location otherwise specified by a state or local building code.

7.8 Photo 1
where required
7.9 Low Volt  
Repair or Replace
Noted: low volt wiring in trees. I suggest the limbs be cut back to reduce damage potential.
7.9 Photo 1
low volt wiring in trees
7.9 Photo 2
low volt wiring in trees
8. Insulation and Ventilation
8.2 Misc Insulated Areas  
Repair or Replace
Item(s) of concern:
  • abandoned mechanical exhaust vent in attic open to below

I suggest all easily removable parts of this vent be removed to prevent pests from entering home via attic as well as heat loss/gain.

8.2 Photo 1
abandoned mechanical exhaust vent in attic
8.2 Photo 2
open to below
8.2 Photo 3
as seen in basement
8.2 Photo 4
could allow pests to enter home
8.3 Vapor Retarders (in Crawlspace)  
Repair or Replace
Item of concern:
  • vapor barrier not installed in crawlspace   

It is important to separate the ground moisture from the crawlspace area and floor framing. 

I suggest an experienced handy person install a vapor barrier if the radon test comes back low.

Homeowner Tip: 6 mil plastic with overlapping taped seams works well.

8.3 Photo 1
vapor barrier not installed in crawlspace
8.4 Ventilation of Attic and/or Roof System  
Repair or Replace
Item(s) of concern:
  • roof ventilation is not adequate for this home (original or addition)

It is a common building practice to provide proper roof ventilation. Attic ventilation is a 2-part system consisting of lower soffit vents and roof top vents.

A hot attic/rafter space deteriorates the shingles faster than a cooler attic/rafter, this accumulated heat will push into the living spaces creating an uncomfortable environment for the occupants. The air conditioner works harder thus reducing the expected lifespan of the appliance.

I suggest consulting with an insulation contractor or roofing contractor for further evaluation.

Notes for original home: no soffit venting; ridge venting appears to not be present (ridge cap would have to be removed to verify.

Notes for addition: ridge venting not verified without removing ridge cap. Soffit venting - exterior vents present but rafter bays appear to be blocked by rolled up fiberglass batt insulation.

Note: for assistance with calculating adequate roof ventilation

Owens Corning Roof Ventilation Calculator Owens Corning Roof Ventilation Calculator and For common products NFVA (net free ventilation area)

8.4 Photo 1
2-part system
8.4 Photo 2
ridge venting appears to not be present - both structures
8.4 Photo 3
common product for venting for metal roofs
8.4 Photo 4
option for ridge venting for metal roofs
8.4 Photo 5
rafter bays appear to be blocked by rolled up fiberglass batt insulation
8.4 Photo 6
rafter bays appear to be blocked by rolled up fiberglass batt insulation
8.4 Photo 7
style of soffit vent at addition
8.4 Photo 8
original home: no soffit venting
8.4 Photo 9
suggest style of soffit venting for original home - continuous
9. Built-In Kitchen Appliances
9.0 Dishwasher  
Repair or Replace
Item(s) of concern:
  • no high loop

The dishwasher drain line is not installed properly so as to not cause nasty water to back into the dishwasher if the sink backs up.

Consider a high loop installation to prevent this from occurring.

I suggest repairs by a qualified plumber.

9.0 Photo 1
dishwasher drain line
9.0 Photo 2
needs high loop
10. Detached Garage
10.0 Summary of Structure  
Repair or Replace
(2) Noted: gutter downspout disconnected and downspouts not extended. I suggest making these repairs to protect your investment.
10.0 Photo 8
gutter downspout disconnected
10.0 Photo 9
extend downspouts


Prepared Using HomeGauge http://www.HomeGauge.com : Licensed To Todd Gourley
Top Table of Contents Bottom

IHS: Improvements for Health and Safety Summary


Reveal360 Inspection Services LLC

4742 Westbury Dr.
Fort Collins, Colorado. 80526
970-389-1250

Customer
OLDER HOME INSPECTION

Address
Older Home
Fort Collins CO 00000

The following items are suggestions for improvements to occupant health and safety and should be considered for implementation upon moving in to the home.

4. Interiors
4.6 Windows  
Repair or Replace, Improvements for Health and Safety
(3) Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • window fall protection not present at primary bedroom windows

This condition is a safety concern for small children that may be present in this home. The required limiting device can be purchased by the manufacturer of the windows.

A knowledgable handy person or carpenter could install the device or barrier.

More explanation: (Eric Clapton Rule)

  • 4" maximum opening allowed at windows where the clear opening is less than 24" to the finished floor and the exterior grade is greater than 6' down

Option: a barrier installed to a height 24" from finished floor could be fabricated and installed to provide protection.

4.6 Photo 3
primary bedroom windows
4.6 Photo 4
clear opening is less than 24" to the finished floor


Prepared Using HomeGauge http://www.HomeGauge.com : Licensed To Todd Gourley
Top Table of Contents Bottom
Results at a glance

99

Items Inspected

Total number in report.

33

Summary Comments

Total number in report.

64

Styles & Materials

Total number in report.

2

Videos

Total number in report.

189

Photos

Total number in report.

1. Roofing
Description
The home inspector shall observe: Roof covering; Roof drainage systems; Flashings; Skylights, chimneys, and roof penetrations; and Signs of' leaks or abnormal condensation on building components. The home inspector shall: Describe the type of roof covering materials; and Report the methods used to observe the roofing. The home inspector is not required to: Walk on the roofing; or Observe attached accessories including but not limited to solar systems, antennae, and lightning arrestors.
Styles & Materials: Roofing
Roof Covering:
Metal-ProPanel, screw down
Viewed roof covering from:
Drone
 
Items: Roofing
1.0 Roof Coverings
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) The home has Pro-Panel corrugated metal roofing. Generally, it appears to be in serviceable condition, see exception in item 2 .

Ask sellers for any roof information. Metal Sales for additional information

Note: bottom edge screws may back out due to expansion and contraction. Any screws that back out - unscrew, put silicone sealant on threads, and screw back in.

Noted: installed snow cleats are common to protect people below from sliding snow but also to keep the gutters from being damaged.

1.0 Photo 1
Pro-Panel corrugated metal roofing with snow cleats
(2) Item(s) of concern:
  • inadequate splice of ridge cap - original home

The opening at the splice has allowed moisture to enter the attic space as evidenced by discoloration on top of the insulation.

I suggest a roofing contractor with experience in installing metal roofs rebuild the splice and install ridge venting per section 8.4.

1.0 Photo 2
possible inadequate slice of ridge cap - original home
1.0 Photo 3
water entry from ridge _ staining on insulation
1.0 Photo 4
opening at splice
(3) Item(s) of concern:
  • openings to attic space- original home - front right corner

Openings should be closed to prevent pest from entering the attic space.

I suggest a roofing contractor with experience in metal roofing completely close off unnecessary openings and check the entire roof for similar concerns.

1.0 Photo 5
openings to attic space- original home
1.1 Flashings
Comments: Inspected
1.2 Skylights, Chimneys and Roof Penetrations
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) Noted: heavy use of sealant around B-vent - maintain this sealant annually

Sliding snow has likely stuck above this vent creating water leaks in the past.

I suggest a roofing contractor or knowledgable handy person install snow splitters for metal roof. Google that phrase.

1.2 Photo 1
heavy use of sealant around B-vent
1.2 Photo 2
example of a snow splitter
(2) Item(s) of concern:
  • sealant in place of proper flashing at cast iron vent
  • incorrect flashing style at plumbing vent

I suggest an experienced roofing contractor install the correct flashing around plumbing penetrations.

1.2 Photo 3
sealant in place of proper flashing at cast iron vent
1.2 Photo 4
incorrect flashing style at plumbing vent
1.2 Photo 5
example of correct flashing for metal roofs
1.2 Photo 6
done correctly at addition
1.3 Roof Drainage Systems
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) To protect your investment: keep roof water and surface water away from the foundation 3-6' minimum.

Noted: chain downspouts are ineffective methods of moving water

Chain downspouts do not direct water away from the foundation.  They can also cause water to splash on the porch column/wall potentially causing settlement.

I suggest the gutter system include methods to contain and direct water away from the structure.

1.3 Photo 1
water management
1.3 Photo 2
chain downspout
1.3 Photo 3
if kept - slope earth
(2) Item(s) of function concern:
  • gutter downspouts missing extensions and/or need redirection

I suggest adding extensions to the downspouts and routing them 3-6' away from the foundation to prevent foundation settlement. They can be purchased at most home improvement stores.

Note: settlement has occurred around the perimeter of the foundation, over time, due to this condition.

Noted: front left gutter not secure to brick. I suggest a handy person reattach to the brick.

1.3 Photo 4
extend downspouts
1.3 Photo 5
extend downspouts
1.3 Photo 6
front left gutter not secure to brick
1.3 Photo 7
front left gutter not secure to brick
X
1.3 Photo 8
video
(3) Noted: multiple locations were a trench drain or below ground drainage is advised

To prevent water from depositing at the foundation, I suggest installing a trench drain where an extension would cause a trip hazard.

1.3 Photo 9
consider alternative extension method
1.3 Photo 10
example of trench drain
The roof of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Roof coverings and skylights can appear to be leak proof during inspection and weather conditions. Our inspection makes an attempt to find a leak but sometimes cannot. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.
2. Exterior
Description
The home inspector shall observe: Wall cladding, flashings, and trim; Entryway doors and a representative number of windows; Garage door operators; Decks, balconies, stoops, steps, areaways, porches and applicable railings; Eaves, soffits, and fascias; and Vegetation, grading, drainage, driveways, patios, walkways, and retaining walls with respect to their effect on the condition of the building. The home inspector shall: Describe wall cladding materials; Operate all entryway doors and a representative number of windows; Operate garage doors manually or by using permanently installed controls for any garage door operator; Report whether or not any garage door operator will automatically reverse or stop when meeting reasonable resistance during closing; and Probe exterior wood components where deterioration is suspected. The home inspector is not required to observe: Storm windows, storm doors, screening, shutters, awnings, and similar seasonal accessories; Fences; Presence of safety glazing in doors and windows; Garage door operator remote control transmitters; Geological conditions; Soil conditions; Recreational facilities (including spas, saunas, steam baths, swimming pools, tennis courts, playground equipment, and other exercise, entertainment, or athletic facilities); Detached buildings or structures; or Presence or condition of buried fuel storage tanks. The home inspector is not required to: Move personal items, panels, furniture, equipment, plant life, soil, snow, ice or debris that obstructs access or visibility.
Styles & Materials: Exterior
Siding Style:
Brick
Lap
Shake style panels
Wood -decorative patterns
Siding Material:
Composite Wood
Full brick
Wood
Exterior Entry Door:
Insulated glass
Wood
Appurtenance:
Balcony
Covered patio
Covered porch
Driveway:
Concrete
 
Items: Exterior
2.0 Wall Cladding Flashing and Trim
Comments: Inspected
Noted: near back patio - visible insulation - cover with another trim board
2.0 Photo 1
visible insulation - cover with another trim board
2.1 Eaves, Soffits and Fascias
Comments: Inspected
2.2 Exterior penetrations
Comments: Inspected
2.3 Exterior hose bibbs
Comments: Inspected
2.4 Irrigation Backflow Preventer
Comments: Inspected
FYI ONLY: An irrigation backflow preventer device prevents irrigation water from contaminating the domestic water supply.

This device and the irrigation system gets "blown-out" every October to prevent from freezing. 

Ask the sellers if the system was blown out and where is the controller?

2.4 Photo 1
irrigation backflow preventer
2.4 Photo 2
irrigation water supply shut off valve
2.5 Doors (Exterior)
Comments: Inspected
Noted: french door - primary bedroom to balcony - left panel security features not operating as expected
2.5 Photo 1
french door - primary bedroom to balcony
2.5 Photo 2
left panel security features not operating as expected
2.6 Windows
Comments: Inspected
2.7 Appurtenance (Accessories to the Main Structure)
Comments: Inspected
2.8 Vegetation, Grading, Drainage, Driveway, Walkways, Concrete Surfaces
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) Item(s) of health concern:
  • unsanitary conditions in back yard

The amount of pet feces in the back yard has reach an unhealthy level.

I suggest the sellers have all the dog feces removed.

2.8 Photo 1
unsanitary conditions
(2) Item(s) of concern:
  • cut back vegetation from the original homes foundation

I suggest cutting back the vegetation from the foundation to keep moisture away from the structure.

2.8 Photo 2
not all areas photographed
(3) Maintenance Tip to Protect Your Investment:
  • seal control joints and any slab cracking
  • porch and against home at porch

To help alleviate any future settlement issues due to water penetration to expansive soils below (clay), it is best to seal the concrete with a quality sealer and cover control joints with a quality elastomeric sealant. (good silicone product) suited for concrete. Do not use self leveling at 90 degree joints.    

2.8 Photo 3
crack in patio concrete
2.8 Photo 4
cracking at porch
2.8 Photo 5
seal against house
2.8 Photo 6
crack chaser tool to open cracks
2.8 Photo 7
foam backer rod to pre-fill gaps
2.8 Photo 8
sealant for flat horizontal surfaces, example
2.8 Photo 9
how to install
(4) Tip to Protect Your Investment:
  • flat grading around the perimeter of the home

The grading around the perimeter of a home typically slopes 6 inches per 10 feet minimum to facilitate proper drainage away from the foundation.

I suggest installing and compacting imported fill to provide the minimum slope away from the home and cover with 6 mil plastic.  

Consult a landscaper to provide a cost estimate.

2.8 Photo 10
suggest removing plantings near original homes foundation
2.8 Photo 11
open window wells - original home
2.8 Photo 12
how to correct
The exterior of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.
3. Structural Components
Description
The Home Inspector shall observe structural components including foundations, floors, walls, columns or piers, ceilings and roof. The home inspector shall describe the type of Foundation, floor structure, wall structure, columns or piers, ceiling structure, roof structure. The home inspector shall: Probe structural components where deterioration is suspected; Enter under floor crawl spaces, basements, and attic spaces except when access is obstructed, when entry could damage the property, or when dangerous or adverse situations are suspected; Report the methods used to observe under floor crawl spaces and attics; and Report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components. The home inspector is not required to: Enter any area or perform any procedure that may damage the property or its components or be dangerous to or adversely effect the health of the home inspector or other persons.
Styles & Materials: Structural Components
Foundation:
Stone Block
Method used to observe Crawlspace:
From entry
Limited access
Floor Structure:
2 X 8
Extra Info : unknown for addition
Columns or Piers:
Dry stacked rock or stone
Extra Info : unklnown for addition
Wall Structure:
2 X 4 Wood
Extra Info : 2x6 at addition
Ceiling Structure:
Bottom Chord of Trusses
Bottom of Floor Joists
2X4
Roof Structure:
Engineered wood trusses
2 X 4 Rafters
Extra Info : 2x4 rafters over original
Roof-Type:
Gable
Method used to observe attic:
From entry
Walked
Extra Info : walked attic of original home
Attic info:
Attic access
Extra Info : main level bath, primary closet
 
 
Items: Structural Components
3.0 Foundation
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) Tip To Protect Your Investment:

A stone block/rubble stone foundation is stacked stones with a house on top of them. The stones have gaps in areas that will need to be closed to protect your investment.

I suggest a stone/brick mason tuck point all gaps to prevent water intrusion and potential further settlement of the home.

3.0 Photo 1
evidence of past water events as seen incrawlspace
3.0 Photo 2
use non-shrink grout to seal at foundation and brick
3.0 Photo 3
consider installing a sloped on top of projecting foundation - use non-shrink grout
3.0 Photo 4
water depositing at foundation
3.0 Photo 5
damage to brick and stones needs to be professionally repaired
3.0 Photo 6
suggest non-shrink grout instead of foam
(2) Noted: abandoned gas piping, copper water lines, HVAC ducting litter the crawlspace and withing the floor system as seen from the basement of the original home.

I suggest the crawlspace and floor system be cleared of all abandoned building materials as occupants may not know if the items are actively in use or not.

Note: removal of debris in the crawlspace is recommended prior to installing a vapor barrier or sub membrane radon system.

3.0 Photo 7
debris in crawlspace
3.0 Photo 8
abandoned building materials
3.0 Photo 9
abandoned building materials
3.0 Photo 10
abandoned gas piping
3.1 Walls (Structural)
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item of concern:
  • front right corner of original home - brick mortar joint damage due to mismanagement of roof water

The brick has experienced settlement with displacement and continues to be damaged by mismanagement of roof water.

I suggest a brick mason repair the brick as needed and the downspout be extended well past the foundation/wall.

3.1 Photo 1
front right corner of original home
3.1 Photo 2
brick mortar joint damage due to mismanagement of roof water
3.2 Floors (Structural)
Comments: Inspected
Noted: the structural floors of the 1905 home are constant with this era of construction. Most areas were inaccessible.
3.2 Photo 1
1905 construction methods
3.3 Columns/Piers/Beams
Comments: Inspected
Noted: the structural columns and supporting walls of the 1905 home are constant with this era of construction. Most areas were inaccessible.
3.3 Photo 1
stacked stones
3.3 Photo 2
supporting walls
3.4 Basement Concrete Slab
Comments: Inspected
The additions basement slab is not visible due to the finish materials covering them.
3.5 Ceilings (Structural)
Comments: Inspected
The structural components of the ceilings are not visible due to the finish materials covering them.
3.6 Roof Structure and Attic
Comments: Inspected
The roof framing is in serviceable condition based on 1905 standards. Not all areas visible due to concealment and limited height.

The accessible/visible roof trusses are in serviceable condition. Not all areas accessible or visible due to limited height and insulation cover.
3.6 Photo 1
addition- attic access
3.6 Photo 2
roof trusses
3.6 Photo 3
roof trusses
3.6 Photo 4
roof trusses
3.6 Photo 5
original home - attic access
3.6 Photo 6
1905 2x4 rafters
3.6 Photo 7
1905 2x4 rafters with 1x roof decking
The structure of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.
4. Interiors
Description
The home inspector shall observe: Walls, ceiling, and floors; Steps, stairways, balconies, and railings; Counters and a representative number of installed cabinets; and A representative number of doors and windows. The home inspector shall: Operate a representative number of windows and interior doors; and Report signs of abnormal or harmful water penetration into the building or signs of abnormal or harmful condensation on building components. The home inspector is not required to observe: Paint, wallpaper, and other finish treatments on the interior walls, ceilings, and floors; Carpeting; or Draperies, blinds, or other window treatments.
Styles & Materials: Interiors
Ceiling Materials:
Gypsum Board
Bead Board
Plaster
Wall Material:
Gypsum Board
Plaster
Brick
Bead board
Floor Covering(s):
Hardwood T&G
Tile
Interior Doors:
Molded Composite
Window Manufacturer:
UNKNOWN
Window Types:
Thermal/Insulated
Double-hung
Casement
Sliders
Awning
Cabinetry:
Wood
Countertop:
Solid Surface
 
Items: Interiors
4.0 Ceilings
Comments: Inspected
4.1 Walls
Comments: Inspected
4.2 Floors
Comments: Inspected
(1) Noted: hump in middle of original home running N/S. This indicates the perimeter has settling and the middle support wall has not. I suggest addressing all items in sections 1.3, 2.8, 3.0.
4.2 Photo 1
hump in middle of original home
(2) Noted: closet between two bedroom in original home - ask sellers about hardwood flooring debris and its concealment.
4.2 Photo 2
closet between two bedroom in original home
4.2 Photo 3
hardwood flooring debris and its concealment
4.2 Photo 4
4.3 Steps, Stairways and Railings
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) Item(s) of safety concern:
  • missing guardrail at interior stairs to lower level

Common building practices required a guardrail is installed when there is a potential fall of greater than 30 inches.

I suggest an experienced carpenter install the guardrail for the safety of the occupants.

4.3 Photo 1
missing guardrail
(2) Item(s) of safety concern:
  • lower level handrail pulling out of wall

I suggest an experienced handy person repair for the safety of the occupants.

4.3 Photo 2
lower level handrail
4.3 Photo 3
pulling out of wall
4.4 Counters and Cabinets (representative number)
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item(s) of safety concern:
  • bath vanity not secure to the wall - lower level bath

I suggest properly anchoring this vanity for the safety of the occupants and to prevent possible damage to the structure should plumbing elements become loose and leak.

An experienced handy person could address this item.

4.4 Photo 1
lower level bath
X
4.4 Photo 2
video - bath vanity not secure to the wall
4.5 Doors (representative number)
Comments: Inspected
Noted: lower level bathroom door not latching 

I suggest an adjustment by a handyperson.  

4.5 Photo 1
lower level bathroom door not latching
4.6 Windows
Comments: Repair or Replace, Improvements for Health and Safety
(1) Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • bedroom window well emergency egress ladder not secure

I suggest the ladder be anchored to the well for the safety of the occupants.

4.6 Photo 1
egress ladder not secure
(2) Noted: primary bedroom - awning missing crank handle. They can be purchased at home improvement stores. Ask the sellers if they have it.
4.6 Photo 2
primary bedroom - awning missing crank handle
(3) Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • window fall protection not present at primary bedroom windows

This condition is a safety concern for small children that may be present in this home. The required limiting device can be purchased by the manufacturer of the windows.

A knowledgable handy person or carpenter could install the device or barrier.

More explanation: (Eric Clapton Rule)

  • 4" maximum opening allowed at windows where the clear opening is less than 24" to the finished floor and the exterior grade is greater than 6' down

Option: a barrier installed to a height 24" from finished floor could be fabricated and installed to provide protection.

4.6 Photo 3
primary bedroom windows
4.6 Photo 4
clear opening is less than 24" to the finished floor
The interior of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. The inspection did not involve moving furniture and inspecting behind furniture, area rugs or areas obstructed from view. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.
5. Plumbing System
Description
The home inspector shall observe: Interior water supply and distribution system, including: piping materials, supports, and insulation; fixtures and faucets; functional flow; leaks; and cross connections; Interior drain, waste, and vent system, including: traps; drain, waste, and vent piping; piping supports and pipe insulation; leaks; and functional drainage; Hot water systems including: water heating equipment; normal operating controls; automatic safety controls; and chimneys, flues, and vents; Fuel storage and distribution systems including: interior fuel storage equipment, supply piping, venting, and supports; leaks; and Sump pumps. The home inspector shall describe: Water supply and distribution piping materials; Drain, waste, and vent piping materials; Water heating equipment; and Location of main water supply shutoff device. The home inspector shall operate all plumbing fixtures, including their faucets and all exterior faucets attached to the house, except where the flow end of the faucet is connected to an appliance. The home inspector is not required to: State the effectiveness of anti-siphon devices; Determine whether water supply and waste disposal systems are public or private; Operate automatic safety controls; Operate any valve except water closet flush valves, fixture faucets, and hose faucets; Observe: Water conditioning systems; Fire and lawn sprinkler systems; On-site water supply quantity and quality; On-site waste disposal systems; Foundation irrigation systems; Spas, except as to functional flow and functional drainage; Swimming pools; Solar water heating equipment; or Observe the system for proper sizing, design, or use of proper materials.
Styles & Materials: Plumbing System
Water Source:
Public
Plumbing Water Supply:
Copper
Plumbing Water Distribution:
PEX
Washer Drain Size:
2" Diameter
Plumbing Drain Waste Vent:
Cast iron
PVC
Water Heater Power Source:
Gas (quick recovery)
Water Heater Location:
Basement Mechanical Room
Water Heater Capacity:
Tankless
WH Manufacturer and date:
NAVIEN
Extra Info : 2017 mfg
Items: Plumbing System
5.0 Plumbing Drain, Waste and Vent Systems
Comments: Inspected
(1) FYI ONLY: Air admittance valves (AAV) were used in the home at the following fixtures: kitchen sink, laundry sink.

These are mechanical devices that may need to be replaced if the sink appears to be draining slow and tends to gurgle or if sewer gas is present. 

They can be purchased at most home improvement stores.

5.0 Photo 1
What is an AAV?
5.0 Photo 2
kitchen sink AAV
5.0 Photo 3
laundry sink AAV
(2) The building drain has been upgraded to modern materials.
5.0 Photo 4
building drain has been upgraded
(3) Noted: This home utilizes an ejector pump for the lower level plumbing drains.  A sewage ejector pump system is used when proximity to a direct connection to the sewer main is not possible.

How a Sewage Ejector Pump Works

5.0 Photo 5
sewage ejector pump system
5.1 Plumbing Water Supply, Distribution System and Fixtures
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) Noted: primary bath right sink draining slow

I suggest removing and replacing the p-trap assembly under this sink.  An easy low cost fix for a handy person.  This p-trap can be purchased at home improvement stores.

Note: it is possible to clean the p-traps for reuse.

5.1 Photo 1
primary bath right sink draining slow
5.1 Photo 2
fixture drain clogged here
5.1 Photo 3
primary bath - left sink not currently leaking
(2) Noted: water pressure at about 80 psi. Common limits are 40 - 75 psi.
5.1 Photo 4
about 80 psi
(3) Item(s) of function concern:
  • lower toilet running
  • water shut off valve turned off to conserve water

I suggest repairs by a qualified plumber.
5.1 Photo 5
lower toilet running
5.1 Photo 6
water shut off valve turned off to conserve water
5.2 Hot Water Systems, Controls, Chimneys, Flues and Vents
Comments: Inspected
(1) The Navien tankless water heater is a 2017 model.  It is 6 years old with an average lifespan of 20+ years. It produced hot water at all fixtures.

Ask the current owners when this appliance last had a maintenance check. A water heater should be serviced annually. 

Make this a part of a yearly maintenance plan to extent this average.

5.2 Photo 1
Navien tankless water heater
5.2 Photo 2
6 years old
(2) Note: a condensation pump is utilized as a floor drain is not possible. The pump receives condensate from the high efficiency water heater and pumps it into its own standpipe.
5.2 Photo 3
condensation pump
5.2 Photo 4
dedicated standpipe for water heater and furnace
5.2 Photo 5
similar pump for furnace
5.3 Combustion Air for the Water Heater
Comments: Inspected
The water heater is a direct vent appliance which brings in combustion air directly from the outdoors.
5.4 Main Water Shut-off Device
Comments: Inspected
The main water shut off valve is located in the basement mechanical room. It has been labeled for your convenience.
5.4 Photo 1
main water shut off valve
5.5 Gas Delivery Systems
Comments: Inspected
Noted: unbury gas meter and open up area around regulator vent. Ask sellers if the two gas lines, near the aspen tree are active or not?
5.5 Photo 1
unbury gas meter and open up area around regulator vent
5.5 Photo 2
ask sellers if these gas lines are active
5.6 Sump Basin
Comments: Not Present
Noted: sump basin was not located in this home.

It is uncommon for a slab on grade basement to not have one (addition).

Ask the current owners if they know where it is located.

If it is not present, maybe it is not necessary for this homes location. 

5.6 Photo 1
example
5.7 Sewer Scope
Comments: Inspected
The sewer scope inspection report and video will be sent in a separate email.
5.7 Photo 1
sewer cleanout location
The plumbing in the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Washing machine drain line for example cannot be checked for leaks or the ability to handle the volume during drain cycle. Older homes with galvanized supply lines or cast iron drain lines can be obstructed and barely working during an inspection but then fails under heavy use. If the water is turned off or not used for periods of time (like a vacant home waiting for closing) rust or deposits within the pipes can further clog the piping system. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.
6. Heating / Central Air Conditioning
Description
The home inspector shall observe permanently installed heating and cooling systems including: Heating equipment; Cooling Equipment that is central to home; Normal operating controls; Automatic safety controls; Chimneys, flues, and vents, where readily visible; Solid fuel heating devices; Heat distribution systems including fans, pumps, ducts and piping, with supports, insulation, air filters, registers, radiators, fan coil units, convectors; and the presence of an installed heat source in each room. The home inspector shall describe: Energy source; and Heating equipment and distribution type. The home inspector shall operate the systems using normal operating controls. The home inspector shall open readily openable access panels provided by the manufacturer or installer for routine homeowner maintenance. The home inspector is not required to: Operate heating systems when weather conditions or other circumstances may cause equipment damage; Operate automatic safety controls; Ignite or extinguish solid fuel fires; or Observe: The interior of flues; Fireplace insert flue connections; Humidifiers; Electronic air filters; or The uniformity or adequacy of heat supply to the various rooms.
Styles & Materials: Heating / Central Air Conditioning
Heat Type:
High Efficiency Furnace
Furnace
Heat Source Location:
ATTIC
Basement Mechanical Room
Energy Source:
Natural gas
Heat System Brand and date of mfg:
GOODMAN
Extra Info : attic 2007 mfg
2nd Heat System Brand and date of mfg:
Goodman
Extra Info : mechanical room 2009 mfg (high efficiency)
Ductwork:
Insulated
and
Non-insulated
Filter Type:
Disposable
Filter Size:
16x25
Types of Fireplaces:
Vented gas logs
Operable Fireplaces:
One
Cooling Equipment Type:
Air conditioner unit
Number of AC Only Units:
Two
Cooling Equiment Brand and date of mfg:
GOODMAN
Extra Info : 2009 mfg for AC to original home
2nd Cooling Equiment Brand and date of mfg:
GOODMAN
Extra Info : 2008 mfg
 
Items: Heating / Central Air Conditioning
6.0 Heating Equipment
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) Located in attic above original home:

The Goodman gas fired furnace is a 2007 model. It is 16 years old with an average life span of 16-20 years.

Make this a part of a yearly maintenance plan to extent this average.

Ask the current owners when this appliance last had a maintenance check. A furnace should be serviced annually. 

6.0 Photo 1
Goodman gas fired furnace in attic
6.0 Photo 2
16 years old
(2) Item(s) of concern: furnace in attic
  • vent connector showing rust - possible end of service life
  • blower compartment showing rust and debris
  • air filter damaged with gaps - air filter has to be deformed in order to install
  • very dirty air filter

The furnace appears to not have been routinely serviced.

I suggest an HVAC pro service the furnace and determine the remaining lifespan.

Noted: attic furnace thermostat not functioning. Ask the sellers if the thermostat is operable or has been bypassed?

6.0 Photo 3
vent connector showing rust
6.0 Photo 4
blower compartment showing rust and debris
6.0 Photo 5
blower compartment showing rust
6.0 Photo 6
attic furnace - air filter damaged with gaps
6.0 Photo 7
air filter has to be deformed in order to install
6.0 Photo 8
very dirty air filter
6.0 Photo 9
attic furnace thermostat not functioning
6.0 Photo 10
has batteries and wiring
(3) Located in the basement under the original home:

The Goodman high efficiency gas fired furnace is a 2009 model. It is 14 years old with an average life span of 16-20 years or longer with routine maintenance.  Routine maintenance is every 3 years.

Ask the current owners when this appliance last had a maintenance check and suggest it to be serviced if not within the past 3 years.

An HVAC Pro would provide this service.

6.0 Photo 11
high efficiency gas fired furnace
6.0 Photo 12
14 years old
6.0 Photo 13
when last serviced?
6.0 Photo 14
air filter location
6.1 Normal Operating Controls
Comments: Inspected
6.2 Automatic Safety Controls
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item(s) of safety concern:
  • safety switch not functioning as intended - both furnaces
  • attic furnace switch has been bypassed
  • safety switch is taped over - basement furnace

I suggest an HVAC pro enable the safety switches for the safety of those opening the cabinet doors.

6.2 Photo 1
attic furnace switch has been bypassed
6.2 Photo 2
safety switch is taped over - basement furnace
6.3 Distribution Systems
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) Item(s) of interior air heath concern:
  • ducts attached to the furnace distribution system may need to be cleaned
  • evidence based on debris in many supply registers
  • level of debris at air filter and in blower compartment of attic furnace

I suggest contracting with a duct cleaning company to clean the HVAC ducting system to improve the air of the interior environment.

6.3 Photo 1
debris in many supply registers
(2) Noted: due to the condition of the attic furnaces air filter and accumulated debris in the furnace cabinet; climbing into the attic has been inconvenient. I suggest relocation of air filters to the return air ducts grill located in the original homes ceiling and primary bedroom ceiling. An HVAC pro could modify the return air grills so that each one holds an air filter.
6.3 Photo 2
return air duct to primary bedroom
6.3 Photo 3
return air grill in primary bedroom
6.3 Photo 4
return air duct to original homes ceiling
6.3 Photo 5
HVA pro to change out grill to accept an air filter
6.4 Chimneys, Flues and Vents (for fireplaces and heat systems)
Comments: Inspected
6.5 Combustion air for gas fired appliances
Comments: Inspected
Attic furnace uses attic space for combustion air. Basement furnace is a direct vent appliance which brings outdoor combustion air directly into the cabinet.
6.6 Return air present
Comments: Inspected
6.7 Humidifier
Comments: Not Present
6.8 Gas Distribution System
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item of safety concern:
  • CSST (Corrugated Stainless Steel Tubing) (yellow) was used for part of the gas delivery system.

This particular CSST (yellow) is susceptible to nearby lightning strikes and requires electrical bonding to the grounding electrode system.

I suggest this grounding procedure to be performed by a qualified, knowledgeable electrician according to the specific manufacturer’s instructions.

The manufacturer’s instructions for this bonding/grounding can be found as an attachment in the table of contents.

Additional information for builders, contractors and sub contractors:

A photo is attached to help illustrate: yellow jacket is not arc-resistant, black jacket is...

The related code is 2018 IRC G2411.2 CSST.

This section applies to corrugated stainless steel tubing (CSST) that is not listed with an arc-resistant jacket or coating system in accordance with ANSI LC1/CSA 6.26. CSST gas piping systems and piping systems containing one or more segments of CSST shall be electrically continuous and bonded to the electrical service grounding electrode system or, where provided, the lightning protection grounding electrode system.

6.8 Photo 1
yellow CSST
6.8 Photo 2
yellow CSST in attic
6.8 Photo 3
yellow CSST
6.8 Photo 4
where to ground
6.8 Photo 5
yellow jacket is not arc-resistant, black jacket is...
6.9 Solid Fuel Heating Devices (fireplace, wood stove)
Comments: Not Present
6.10 Gas/LP Firelogs and Fireplaces
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) The living room vented gas fireplace operates.

I suggest the fireplace be serviced based on current conditions found under the fireplace and the soot build-up on termination.

6.10 Photo 1
living room vented gas fireplace
6.10 Photo 2
accumulation of dog hair and debris
6.10 Photo 3
soot build-up
(2) Item(s) of safety concern:
  • gas shut off for fireplace not found - is it one as seen in photograph?

It is required by common building practices to label (near the fireplace) where the gas shut off is located when the shut off is elsewhere in the home.

I suggest the sellers or fireplace specialist (while there cleaning the unit) located and label the gas shut off valve.

6.10 Photo 4
gas shut off for fireplace?
6.11 Cooling Equipment
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) The Goodman AC unit is a 2009 model, it is 14 years old with an average life span of 10-15 years.  It is near the end of its average lifespan.

I recommend an HVAC professional evaluate the appliance for the remaining useable life and provide estimates for replacement, if needed.


Item(s) of concern:
  • wiring exposed to moisture at misaligned cabinet

I suggest repairs and evaluation by an HVAC pro.

6.11 Photo 1
Goodman AC unit 14 years old
6.11 Photo 2
wiring exposed to moisture
(2) The Goodman AC unit is a 2008 model, it is 15 years old with an average life span of 10-15 years.  It is near the end of its average lifespan.

I recommend an HVAC professional evaluate the appliance for the remaining useable life and provide estimates for replacement, if needed.

6.11 Photo 3
Goodman AC unit
6.11 Photo 4
15 years old
(3) Item(s) of concern:
  • AC system condensate discharge depositing at foundation - right side of home

Since water only comes out of this discharge when the AC is operating (hot temps = won't freeze), I suggest an experienced handy person extend this discharge down to the grading and away from the foundation.

6.11 Photo 5
AC system condensate discharge depositing at foundation
6.12 Normal Operating Controls
Comments: Not Inspected
I was unable to operate the AC units due to the below 60 degree temperatures. (per Standards of Practice)
6.13 Washer and Dryer
Comments: Not Inspected
Ask the sellers if the washer and dryer operate.
6.14 Electric Heat
Comments: Inspected
The primary and guest bath electric radiant in-floor heat operated as expected.
6.14 Photo 1
primary bathroom
6.14 Photo 2
primary bathroom
6.14 Photo 3
guest bath
The heating and cooling system of this home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. The inspection is not meant to be technically exhaustive. The inspection does not involve removal and inspection behind service door or dismantling that would otherwise reveal something only a licensed heat contractor would discover. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.
7. Electrical System
Description
The home inspector shall observe: Service entrance conductors; Service equipment, grounding equipment, main over current device, and main and distribution panels; Amperage and voltage ratings of the service; Branch circuit conductors, their over current devices, and the compatibility of their ampacities and voltages; The operation of a representative number of installed ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling's exterior walls; The polarity and grounding of all receptacles within six feet of interior plumbing fixtures, and all receptacles in the garage or carport, and on the exterior of inspected structures; The operation of ground fault circuit interrupters; and Smoke detectors. The home inspector shall describe: Service amperage and voltage; Service entry conductor materials; Service type as being overhead or underground; and Location of main and distribution panels. The home inspector shall report any observed aluminum branch circuit wiring. The home inspector shall report on presence or absence of smoke detectors, and operate their test function, if accessible, except when detectors are part of a central system. The home inspector is not required to: Insert any tool, probe, or testing device inside the panels; Test or operate any over current device except ground fault circuit interrupters; Dismantle any electrical device or control other than to remove the covers of the main and auxiliary distribution panels; or Observe: Low voltage systems; Security system devices, heat detectors, or carbon monoxide detectors; Telephone, security, cable TV, intercoms, or other ancillary wiring that is not a part of the primary electrical distribution system; or Built-in vacuum equipment.
Styles & Materials: Electrical System
Electrical Service Conductors:
Below ground
Panel Capacity:
150 AMP
Panel Type:
Circuit breakers
GFCI Breakers
AFCI Breakers
Electric Panel Manufacturer:
SQUARE D
Branch wire 15 and 20 AMP:
Copper
Wiring Methods:
Insulated
Items: Electrical System
7.0 Service Entrance
Comments: Inspected
7.1 Service and Grounding Equipment, Main Overcurrent Device, Main and Distribution Panels
Comments: Inspected
The service entrance with main circuit breaker panel is located outside with a sub panel in the mechanical room.
7.1 Photo 1
service entrance with main breaker panel
7.1 Photo 2
150 amp disconnect
7.1 Photo 3
sub panel in the mechanical room
7.2 Branch Circuit Conductors, Overcurrent Devices and Compatability of their Amperage and Voltage
Comments: Inspected
The breaker size was compatible with the wire sizing.
7.2 Photo 1
main breaker panel
7.2 Photo 2
sub panel
7.3 Connected Devices and Fixtures (Observed from a representative number operation of ceiling fans, lighting fixtures, switches and receptacles located inside the house, garage, and on the dwelling's exterior walls)
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) Item(s) of function concern:
  • east wall - middle receptacle showing ungrounded (all others grounded so likely a loose wire)
  • j-box needs cover - basement of original home
  • equipment with no function?? - basement of original home - suggest labeling as "not in use" or remove

I suggest repairs by a qualified electrician.

7.3 Photo 1
east wall - middle receptacle showing ungrounded
7.3 Photo 2
j-box needs cover - basement of original home
7.3 Photo 3
equipment with no function??
(2) Noted: primary bedroom - possible burned out bulb
7.3 Photo 4
primary bedroom - possible burned out bulb
7.4 Polarity and Grounding of Receptacles
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • laundry, main level bath - left of toilet, sewage ejection pump receptacles not GFCI protected

I suggest these receptacles be replaced with GFCI receptacles for the safety of the occupants. OR install a GFCI breaker at main breaker panel.

Consult a qualified electrician to address these items.

Additional information: A GFCI (ground fault circuit interrupter) receptacle is an electrical device that is designed to shut off power when it detects current flow through an unintended path such as a person or water.  They are used to reduce the risk of electrical shock and electrical fires. 

For more on where GFCI's are required:

Where GFCI's are required

7.4 Photo 1
laundry not GFCI protected
7.4 Photo 2
main level bath - left of toilet
7.4 Photo 3
sewage ejection pump
7.5 Operation of GFCI (Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters)
Comments: Inspected
FYI ONLY: The kitchen receptacles are GFCI protected and resets at the main breaker panel.
7.6 AFCI (ARC Fault Circuit Interrupters)
Comments: Inspected
FYI ONLY: Arc Fault Circuit Interrupters (AFCI) are breakers that detect arcing in plugged-in appliances and behind walls.  If this AFCI breaker trips, you can reset this from inside the main breaker panel or sub panel.
7.6 Photo 1
ASCI breaker in outside panel
7.6 Photo 2
AFCI breakers=ones with test buttons
7.7 Smoke Detectors
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • smoke detectors not located - in hall ceiling outside primary bedroom

I suggest installing smoke detectors per the information below:

Smoke Detectors are required in the following locations:

1. In each sleeping room.

2. Outside each sleeping area in the immediate vicinity of the bedrooms.

3. On each additional story of the dwelling, including basements and habitable attics but not including crawl spaces and uninhabitable attics. 

Smoke detectors alert occupants to a fire/smoke in the home. I suggest they are installed in the required locations and tested periodically.

Smoke detectors can be hardwired with battery backup or battery operated only; each will meet the requirement.

An electrician or experienced handy person could address this item.

7.7 Photo 1
where required
7.8 Carbon Monoxide Alarms
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item(s) of health and safety concern:
  • No carbon monoxide alarm for upper level bedroom - install in hall just outside bedroom door

An electrician or experienced handy person could address this item.

How should carbon monoxide alarms be installed? According to this law, carbon monoxide alarms must be installed in one of the following ways:

- Wired directly into the home’s electrical system

-   Directly plugged into an electrical outlet (does not require a switch other than a circuit breaker)

-   Any battery powered alarm can be attached to the wall or ceiling of the home.     

Where should carbon monoxide alarms be installed? This law requires that an operational carbon monoxide alarm be installed within 15 feet of the entrance to each bedroom (or other room lawfully used for sleeping purposes), or in any location otherwise specified by a state or local building code.

7.8 Photo 1
where required
7.9 Low Volt
Comments: Repair or Replace
Noted: low volt wiring in trees. I suggest the limbs be cut back to reduce damage potential.
7.9 Photo 1
low volt wiring in trees
7.9 Photo 2
low volt wiring in trees
The electrical system of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Outlets were not removed and the inspection was only visual. Any outlet not accessible (behind the refrigerator for example) was not inspected or accessible. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.
8. Insulation and Ventilation
Description
The home inspector shall observe: Insulation and vapor retarders in unfinished spaces; Ventilation of attics and foundation areas; Kitchen, bathroom, and laundry venting systems; and the operation of any readily accessible attic ventilation fan, and, when temperature permits, the operation of any readily accessible thermostatic control. The home inspector shall describe: Insulation in unfinished spaces; and Absence of insulation in unfinished space at conditioned surfaces. The home inspector shall: Move insulation where readily visible evidence indicates the need to do so; and Move insulation where chimneys penetrate roofs, where plumbing drain/waste pipes penetrate floors, adjacent to earth filled stoops or porches, and at exterior doors. The home inspector is not required to report on: Concealed insulation and vapor retarders; or Venting equipment that is integral with household appliances.
Styles & Materials: Insulation and Ventilation
Attic Insulation:
Cellulose
Ventilation:
Ridge vents
Soffit Vents
Exhaust Fans:
Fan only
Dryer Power Source:
220 Electric
Floor System Insulation:
NOT VISIBLE
 
Items: Insulation and Ventilation
8.0 Insulation in Attic or Roof system
Comments: Inspected
Noted: original home - displaced insulation in attic - suggest raking even.
  • attic access lids needs insulation cover
  • abandoned vent in original home - cover with wood then insulated over

In the future, consider adding more insulation (original homes attic) to conserve energy and increase the thermal resistance to escaping interior heat in the winters and high attic heat, in the summers, from pushing into the upper level habitable spaces.
8.0 Photo 1
addition attic access needs insulation cover
8.0 Photo 2
original homes bathroom - attic access needs insulation cover
8.0 Photo 3
8" = R30
8.0 Photo 4
8" = R30
8.0 Photo 5
more like R30 at 8.3" deep
8.0 Photo 6
areas of low insulation
8.0 Photo 7
areas of high insulation
8.0 Photo 8
displaced insulation in attic of original home
8.0 Photo 9
cover with wood then insulated over
8.0 Photo 10
comparison
8.1 Insulation Under Floor System
Comments: Not Present
Noted: no rim insulation - original home

The perimeter rims of the floor system is not insulated. Heat loss can occur more on this home than one that is properly insulated at the rims.

I suggest adding fiberglass or spray foam at the rims to reduce heat loss and to provide a warmer crawlspace during the cold months thus protecting the water pipes and equipment.

8.1 Photo 1
where to install
8.2 Misc Insulated Areas
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item(s) of concern:
  • abandoned mechanical exhaust vent in attic open to below

I suggest all easily removable parts of this vent be removed to prevent pests from entering home via attic as well as heat loss/gain.

8.2 Photo 1
abandoned mechanical exhaust vent in attic
8.2 Photo 2
open to below
8.2 Photo 3
as seen in basement
8.2 Photo 4
could allow pests to enter home
8.3 Vapor Retarders (in Crawlspace)
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item of concern:
  • vapor barrier not installed in crawlspace   

It is important to separate the ground moisture from the crawlspace area and floor framing. 

I suggest an experienced handy person install a vapor barrier if the radon test comes back low.

Homeowner Tip: 6 mil plastic with overlapping taped seams works well.

8.3 Photo 1
vapor barrier not installed in crawlspace
8.4 Ventilation of Attic and/or Roof System
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item(s) of concern:
  • roof ventilation is not adequate for this home (original or addition)

It is a common building practice to provide proper roof ventilation. Attic ventilation is a 2-part system consisting of lower soffit vents and roof top vents.

A hot attic/rafter space deteriorates the shingles faster than a cooler attic/rafter, this accumulated heat will push into the living spaces creating an uncomfortable environment for the occupants. The air conditioner works harder thus reducing the expected lifespan of the appliance.

I suggest consulting with an insulation contractor or roofing contractor for further evaluation.

Notes for original home: no soffit venting; ridge venting appears to not be present (ridge cap would have to be removed to verify.

Notes for addition: ridge venting not verified without removing ridge cap. Soffit venting - exterior vents present but rafter bays appear to be blocked by rolled up fiberglass batt insulation.

Note: for assistance with calculating adequate roof ventilation

Owens Corning Roof Ventilation Calculator Owens Corning Roof Ventilation Calculator and For common products NFVA (net free ventilation area)

8.4 Photo 1
2-part system
8.4 Photo 2
ridge venting appears to not be present - both structures
8.4 Photo 3
common product for venting for metal roofs
8.4 Photo 4
option for ridge venting for metal roofs
8.4 Photo 5
rafter bays appear to be blocked by rolled up fiberglass batt insulation
8.4 Photo 6
rafter bays appear to be blocked by rolled up fiberglass batt insulation
8.4 Photo 7
style of soffit vent at addition
8.4 Photo 8
original home: no soffit venting
8.4 Photo 9
suggest style of soffit venting for original home - continuous
8.5 Venting Systems
Comments: Inspected
8.6 Radon Mitigation System
Comments: Inspected
Radon Levels: testing in progress-currently no system. A separate email will be sent with the results.
The insulation and ventilation of the home was inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Venting of exhaust fans or clothes dryer cannot be fully inspected and bends or obstructions can occur without being accessible or visible (behind wall and ceiling coverings). Only insulation that is visible was inspected. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.
9. Built-In Kitchen Appliances
Description
The home inspector shall observe and operate the basic functions of the following kitchen appliances: Permanently installed dishwasher, through its normal cycle; Range, cook top, and permanently installed oven; Trash compactor; Garbage disposal; Ventilation equipment or range hood; and Permanently installed microwave oven. The home inspector is not required to observe: Clocks, timers, self-cleaning oven function, or thermostats for calibration or automatic operation; Non built-in appliances; or Refrigeration units. The home inspector is not required to operate: Appliances in use; or Any appliance that is shut down or otherwise inoperable.
Styles & Materials: Built-In Kitchen Appliances
Disposer Brand:
IN SINK ERATOR
Exhaust/Range hood:
BROAN
Dishwasher Brand:
MAYTAG
Range/Oven:
GENERAL ELECTRIC
Add'l info: : gas cooktop with electric oven
Built in Microwave:
NONE
 
Items: Built-In Kitchen Appliances
9.0 Dishwasher
Comments: Repair or Replace
Item(s) of concern:
  • no high loop

The dishwasher drain line is not installed properly so as to not cause nasty water to back into the dishwasher if the sink backs up.

Consider a high loop installation to prevent this from occurring.

I suggest repairs by a qualified plumber.

9.0 Photo 1
dishwasher drain line
9.0 Photo 2
needs high loop
9.1 Ranges/Ovens/Cooktops
Comments: Inspected
Noted: gas shut off valve not located for cooktop. I suggest asking the sellers where it is located.
9.1 Photo 1
gas shut off valve not located for cooktop
9.2 Range Hood (s)
Comments: Inspected
The rangehood did operate as expected. It does exhaust to the outdoors.
9.2 Photo 1
rangehood
9.2 Photo 2
exhausting to the outdoors
9.2 Photo 3
as seen in attic
9.3 Food Waste Disposer
Comments: Inspected
9.4 Microwave Cooking Equipment (built-in)
Comments: Not Present
The built-in appliances of the home were inspected and reported on with the above information. While the inspector makes every effort to find all areas of concern, some areas can go unnoticed. Please be aware that the inspector has your best interest in mind. Any repair items mentioned in this report should be considered before purchase. It is recommended that qualified contractors be used in your further inspection or repair issues as it relates to the comments in this inspection report.
10. Detached Garage
Items: Detached Garage
10.0 Summary of Structure
Comments: Repair or Replace
(1) The detached office is a conversion from a prior garage.  It is likely slab-on-grade construction but could not be verified. The electric baseboard heat operated but is much to long for this space. A 4' section would have sufficed. The roof structure is vaulted but appears to be 2x4 rafter construction.
10.0 Photo 1
detached office
10.0 Photo 2
conversion from a prior garage
10.0 Photo 3
garage door locked
10.0 Photo 4
electric baseboard heat
10.0 Photo 5
heating operated
10.0 Photo 6
sub panel off house power
10.0 Photo 7
compatible wiring size to breaker
(2) Noted: gutter downspout disconnected and downspouts not extended. I suggest making these repairs to protect your investment.
10.0 Photo 8
gutter downspout disconnected
10.0 Photo 9
extend downspouts

Reveal360 Inspection Services LLC

4742 Westbury Dr.
Fort Collins, Colorado. 80526
970-389-1250

Report Attachments

ATTENTION: This inspection report is incomplete without reading the information included herein at these links/attachments. Note If you received a printed version of this page and did not receive a copy of the report through the internet please contact your inspector for a printed copy of the attachments.

CSST HISTORY

CSST info from ICC

Gastite bonding/grounding instruction

Top Table of Contents Bottom